Status #84908

Do you work for a living? Well I puffin well [...]


Conwy
via The Full Circle Project
Do you work for a living? Well I puffin well do. And I work very puffin hard to look after my family.

Online Etymology

workload (n.)

also work-load, 1939, from work (n.) + load (n.).

work (n.)

Old English weorc, worc "something done, discreet act performed by someone, action (whether voluntary or required)

load (n.)

c. 1200, lode, lade "that which is laid upon a person or beast, burden,"

burden (n.1)

"a load, that which is borne or carried," Old English byrðen "a load, weight, charge, duty;" also "a child;" from Proto-Germanic *burthinjo- "that which is borne" (source also of Old Norse byrðr, Old Saxon burthinnia, German bürde, Gothic baurþei), from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry," also "to bear children."

The shift from -th- to -d- began early 12c. (compare murder (n.), rudder, afford). Archaic burthen is occasionally retained for the specific sense of "capacity of a ship." Beast of burden is from 1740. Burden of proof (Latin onus probandi) "obligation on one party in an action to establish an alleged fact by proof" is recorded from 1590s.

HELLO EVERYONE. DID YOU 'CATCH' THE MEANING?
Tuesday 13 March 2018, 23:57:30
westwynd
A great tune ,one of the best.
Wednesday 14 March 2018, 03:07:44
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